‘Lifestyle’ Category

Book Review: “The 4-Hour Workweek: Expanded & Updated” by Timothy Ferriss

January 4th, 2010

We originally reviewed “The 4-Hour Work Week” here. As we said, the three chapters on “Income Autopilot” are probably among the best, concise step by step guides to building a successful, profitable, automated internet store. But this book is more than that — it’s how to reboot your life. Reading this book is like taking the red pill and discovering you have been living in The Matrix. It’s about escaping the rat race, yes, but — to use another movie metaphor — “You’re no longer part of the System. You’re above the System. Over it. Beyond it…. We are” the New Rich (NR), as Ferriss calls it. The author says: “How is it possible that all the people in the world need exactly eight hours to accomplish their work? It isn’t. Nine to five is arbitrary.” This and other “rules” are just so much software that has been plugged into our brains. Ferris teaches you DEAL (or DELA if you are currently employed), which stands for Definition, Elimination, Automation, and Liberation. The new expanded edition has over 100 pages of new content, including updated resources and more real word examples and suggestions from members of the NR.  It’s about how to use technology more effectively, but it’s also about making more effective decisions — i.e., applying the 80/20 rule to everything, ruthlessly. Topics include outsourcing, mini-retirements (rather than waiting until you’re older) and the concept of geoarbitrage. We recommend you take this red pill. Here’s the link to Amazon:  The 4-Hour Workweek, Expanded and Updated: With Over 100 New Pages of Cutting-Edge Content.

(Reviewed by Rich Dog Millionaire.com)

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A Lesson From “The Twilight Zone”

January 1st, 2010

We were watching  “The Twilight Zone” marathon on Sify and saw the stopwatch episode (“A Kind of Stopwatch”) — where Patrick Thomas McNulty gets a most unusual stopwatch that can freeze time. What struck us was the scene — the black and white  office life of the early 1960s. All of the employees — each at his or her desk — each doing seemingly monotonous, repetitive tasks — only to be interrupted by the favor of a breakfast cart, with coffee and a coffee cake. The protagonist, McNulty, is the oddball — in a world where oddballs do not fit in. In his narration, Rod Serling calls McNulty “the biggest bore on Earth.” He fills the office suggestion box with all kinds of ideas — oddball ideas — that have no place in this world (but could perhaps be a fantastic product for an internet store, a half-century later). It’s like this episode is a parable (or fable) in which the stopwatch is the key to escaping this black and white world. Only the story was written by someone from this world, so the stopwatch becomes immoral (McNulty uses it to rob a bank).

But this is what really struck us: Human beings are still doing the same damn thing a half century later — the same habits, the same lifestyle patterns. Of course we have and use the our technology — the internet, email, etc  — but we use it in ways that essentially reinforce obsolete routines. For example, we all get in our cars to sit on the highway during rush hour, to go to and from offices — back and forth, nine to five. We spend hours at our desks and hours in meetings. When we should be harnassing our ideas and dreams, like so many McNultys, using current technology to build internet businesses instead of filling suggestion boxes.

(original content by Rich Dog Millionaire.com)

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A Website for Young Ladies and Sugar Daddies

April 13th, 2009

New York Times Magazine has a feature story about the dating site, SeekingArrangements.com, where young ladies can find sugar daddies and vice versa.

“The site now claims more than 300,000 registered members… Sugar “babies” outnumber daddies 10 to 1…providing what one sugar daddy called “the best fishing hole I ever fished in… About 30 percent of the arrangements on the site involve the daddy paying an “allowance,” usually a thousand or two a month, though the site claims some reach $10,000. The rest provide the baby with incidental cash, shopping sprees, gifts, travel or the fleeting illusion that theirs is a high-end, easy life. “I get flown to whatever city I want,” wrote a North Carolina college student…” 

Twenty-two-year-old Mercedes says: “I could go out and work three jobs and still go to school and probably make decent grades, but is that really what I want to do? I make more money this way, and I have a lot more fun.” For the babies, it’s free to join; the “daddies” pay $44.95/month (plus an optional $5/month for discreet charges on the credit card statement). A sugar daddy can become a Diamond Club Member, where his income and net worth are verified, and his profile is featured on the home page. Full story here.

Sugar Daddy Site

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Which Money Type Are You?

April 13th, 2009

The April issue of Men’s Health magazine identifies four different “money types.” Which one are you?

The Guardian — Money means security to you and your family (Warren Buffett, Jimmy Stewart)

The Artisan — Money means a new plasma TV (Donald Trump, Brad Pitt)

The Idealist — Money is a stepping stone to your high calling (Oliver Stone, Bill Moyers)

The Rational — Money is proof of your abilities (Barack Obama, Bill Gates)

A quick poll around our group says we’re mostly Artisans and Rationals. Anyway, Men’s Health mag provides a wealth building plan for each type. Also, beware of mixed money-type match-ups. The worst? Idealist + Idealist — and Artisan + Rational (the Rich Dog group lol)

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How to Blog Like Hugh Hefner, Or Build an Internet Business Like That

April 11th, 2009

One of us just finished the biography of Hugh Hefner, Mr Playboy: Hugh Hefner and the American Dream. The key take-way — that kept coming back again and again — is that, Hefner was not only the Editor and Publisher — he was also the demographic. In other words, he was putting together a magazine that HE would want to read. In MORE other words, he built a business that he was passionate about. And THAT is the key to success. Look at McDonald’s: Ray Kroc was not passionate about hamburgers; he was passionate about franchising, and one of his executives was passionate about real estate — the result: a $40 billion business.

What we’re saying is, you need to build a business around something you are passionate about. “Naked girls, sounds good!” Yes, grasshoppers, but look at the situation, Hefner saw the opportunity in 1953 — in a world of Esquire-type mags — for nudity, in a cool, sophisticated way. He wrote a whole Playboy philosophy about it. So what are you passionate about? Yes, it can be sexual, but what opportunity can you find today, in 2009? If you blog about your passion — or if you build an e-retail site about your passion — you are automatically WAY AHEAD of your competition, if they are just thinking of it as a way to make bucks. You will eventually make more bucks because you will attract those who have the same passion as you. You will have no problem blogging about your topic late at night, after work (or adding another product to your online store) because you like — love — doing it, just like your readers/customers love it.

Expertise — and eventual success — is simply, ultimately, the result of passion.

(original content by www.richdogmillionaire.com)

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“The Wealth Report”: Mistresses, Mega-Yachts, and the $100,000 Tuna Fish

March 22nd, 2009

Here’s a great blog to read regularly: The Wealth Report — Wall Street Journal’s “Robert Frank looks at the lives and culture of the wealthy.” Some of our favorite stories:

“Rich Cut Back on Payments to Mistresses”

“Red Tag Sale on Mega Yachts”

“The $100,000 Tuna Fish”

“Sold: The $28 Million Chair”

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